Categories Archives: The Problem: Civilization » Human Supremacy » Mining & Drilling

Visit the global The Problem: Civilization » Human Supremacy » Mining & Drilling archives for posts from all DGR sites.

Newly Described Toad Species Threatened by Geothermal Energy Production

new toads threatened by renewable energy development

One more strike against so-called “renewable” energy production, which is really the same old Earth-destroying, extractive, colonial paradigm—with new marketing: — Researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno, have named three new toad species: the Dixie Valley toad, the Railroad Valley toad and the Hot Creek toad. This is an especially exciting feat because it’s […]

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Update from the Pinyon-Juniper Forest Protection Campaign

In the Great Basin, refugees beget refugees. European settlers who physically performed the most destructive jobs were in many cases refugees from war and economic crisis in their homelands. My ancestors, the Irish, endured centuries of British domination and a wave of Irish fled starvation when the Great Famine struck Ireland a few years before […]

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Pinyon-Juniper Forests: An Ancient Vision Disturbed

This article, from Will Falk of DGR Great Basin (and photographed by Max Wilbert), looks further at the issue Piñon Pine and Juniper forest destruction that is rapidly becoming a campaign focus of DGR members and allies in the region. “Standing in a pinyon-juniper forest on a high slope above Cave Valley not far from […]

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The History of Piñon Pine and Juniper Logging in the Great Basin

At this point, there should be no doubt in anyone’s mind that civilization, especially industrial civilization, inherently destroys the land. It’s part of the very nature of this culture. If you need any more convincing, research into the history of mining in the Great Basin will provide you evidence aplenty. Today, we bring you an […]

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Against All Mining: The Kennecott Mine Must Be Stopped

This is an excerpt from an early draft of a forthcoming book about how “green technology” and “renewable energy” will not save the planet. One of the largest copper mines in the world is the Kennecott Bingham Canyon Mine, which is just outside Salt Lake City in the Oquirrh Mountains. Flying into the city, you […]

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Science vs. the Real World on Mauna Kea

Will Falk is a Deep Green Resistance member who has spent much of the past year assisting indigenous resistance movements at the Unist’ot’en Camp and, more recently, on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. In this article, he speaks to the dangerous powers that come from the science of the dominant culture (civilization). Many view the debate […]

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Air Quality in the Uintah Basin of Utah is 8x Worse Than Los Angeles

Editor’s note: this op-ed from the activists at Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment covers the issue of air quality in the Uintah Basin of northeastern Utah, where a boom in fracking and oil drilling has led to more than 10,000 wells being drilled in the last decade or so. We’ve covered these issues in […]

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80,000 Acres of Land in Southern Nevada up for Fracking

Editors note: this post comes from the folks at Save Nevada’s Water: Ban Fracking In Nevada. While the comment period for the BLM ends soon, public pressure and action against these projects can continue to be effective even afterwards. After all, these are supposed to be federal lands and federal agencies – we’re supposed to […]

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Fracking Operations in Nevada (and across the Great Basin)

ELY, Nev. (AP) – The U.S. Bureau of Land Management is seeking public comment on issues concerning public land being eyed for potential oil and gas leasing in eastern Nevada. The agency’s Ely District is analyzing 94 parcels of public land covering 140,389 acres to identify potential impacts in an environmental assessment. The deadline for […]

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Falling in Love (Unist’ot’en Camp Report-Back)

Unist’ot’en Camp, January 2015 The storm enveloped us. Snow lashed the road. The darkness was total, our headlights casting weak yellow beams into the darkness. Most people had hunkered down in homes and motels, and the roads were near empty. Still, every few minutes a passing truck threw a blinding cloud of dry snow into […]

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